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Citadel of Salah ad-Din (Egypt)

The Citadel of Cairo or Citadel of Saladin  is a medieval Islamic-era fortification in Cairo, Egypt, built by Salah ad-Din (Saladin) and further developed by subsequent Egyptian rulers. It was the seat of government in Egypt and the residence of its rulers for nearly 700 years from the 13th to the 19th centuries. Its location […]

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Citadel of Qaitbay (Egypt)

History Hallway in Citadel of Qaitbay The Qaitbay Citadel in Alexandria is considered one of the most important defensive strongholds, not only in Egypt, but also along the Mediterranean Sea coast. It formulated an important part of the fortification system of Alexandria in the 15th century AD. Lighthouse of Alexandria The Citadel is situated at […]

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Temple of Kom Ombo (Egypt)

The Temple of Kom Ombo is an unusual double temple in the town of Kom Ombo in Aswan Governorate, Upper Egypt. It was constructed during the Ptolemaic dynasty, 180–47 BC. Some additions to it were later made during the Roman period. The building is unique because its ‘double’ design meant that there were courts, halls, sanctuaries and rooms duplicated for two sets of […]

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Wadi Rum (Jordan)

Wadi Rum has been inhabited by many human cultures since prehistoric times, with many cultures–including the Nabataeans–leaving their mark in the form of rock paintings, graffiti, and temples. In the West, Wadi Rum may be best known for its connection with British officer T. E. Lawrence, who passed through several times during the Arab Revolt […]

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Petra (Jordan)

Petra  originally known to its inhabitants as Raqmu, is a historical and archaeological city in southern Jordan. Petra lies around Jabal Al-Madbah in a basin surrounded by mountains which form the eastern flank of the Arabah valley that runs from the Dead Sea to the Gulf of Aqaba. The area around Petra has been inhabited as early as 7,000 BC, and the Nabataeans might have settled in what would […]

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Dead Sea (Holyland)

The Dead Sea  is a salt lake bordered by Jordan to the east and Israel and the West Bank to the west. It lies in the Jordan Rift Valley, and its main tributary is the Jordan River. Its surface and shores are 430.5 metres (1,412 ft) below sea level, Earth’s lowest elevation on land. It is 304 m (997 ft) deep, the deepest hypersaline lake in the world. With a salinity of 342 g/kg, or 34.2% (in 2011), it […]

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Khan el-Khalili (Egypt)

Khan el-Khalili  a famous bazaar and souq (or souk) in the historic center of Cairo, Egypt. The bazaar district is one of Cairo’s main attractions for tourists and Egyptians alike. It is also home to many Egyptian artisans and workshops involved in the production of traditional crafts and souvenirs. History Cairo itself was originally founded in 969 CE as a royal city and capital for the Fatimid Caliphate, an […]

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Jerusalem (HolyLand)

Jerusalem ; Hebrew: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם About this soundYerushaláyim; Arabic: القُدس‎ About this soundal-Quds or Bayt al-Maqdis, also spelled Baitul Muqaddas is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea. It is one of the oldest cities in the world, and is considered holy […]

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Bethlehem (HolyLand)

Bethlehem  Arabic: بيت لحم‎ Bayta Laḥm, “House of Meat”; Hebrew: בֵּית לֶחֶם Bet Leḥem, Hebrew pronunciation: , “House of Bread”; Ancient Greek: Βηθλεέμ Greek pronunciation; Latin: Bethleem; initially named after Canaanite fertility god Lehem) is a city located in the central West Bank, Palestine, about 10 km (6.2 miles) south of Jerusalem. Its population is approximately 25,000 people. It is the capital of the Bethlehem Governorate. The economy is primarily tourist-driven, peaking during the […]

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Saint Catherine’s Monastery (Egypt)

Christian traditions According to tradition, Catherine of Alexandria was a Christian martyr sentenced to death on the breaking wheel. When this failed to kill her, she was beheaded. According to tradition, angels took her remains to Mount Sinai. Around the year 800, monks from the Sinai Monastery found her remains. Although it is commonly known as Saint Catherine’s, the monastery’s full official name […]

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King Farouk Palace (Egypt)

The King Farouk Palace  extensive Montaza Palace grounds first had the Salamlek Palace, built in 1892 by Khedive Abbas II, the last Muhammad Ali Dynasty ruler to hold the Khedive title over the Khedivate of Egypt and Sudan. It was used as a hunting lodge and residence for his companion.[1] The larger Al-Haramlik Palace and […]

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Opera House (Egypt)

History In October 1988, President Mubarak and Prince Tomohito of Mikasa, the younger brother of the Japanese Emperor, inaugurated the National Cultural Centre Cairo Opera House. It was the first time for Japan to stage a Kabuki show, a traditional popular drama with singing and dancing, in Africa or the Arab World. In recognition of the Cairo Opera House, the London Royal […]

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Why Egypt is a land of great beauty?

Egypt is a land of great beauty. It has a lot of historical places and monuments. It has one of the longest rivers around the world, Nile River. The capital of Egypt, Cairo, includes the Egyptian museum, the Coptic museum that contains sixteen thousand pieces of Coptic legacy. Also, there is Saint Virgin Mary’s Coptic […]

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The Abu Simbel Temples (Egypt)

Abu Simbel temples are two massive rock temples at Abu Simbel , a village in Aswan Governorate, Upper Egypt, near the border with Sudan. They are situated on the western bank of Lake Nasser, about 230 km (140 mi) southwest of Aswan (about 300 km (190 mi) by road). The complex is part of the […]

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